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Research

Research

Indicator
Latest release date
Latest Value
Previous Value
Comparison against the previous value
England’s average
Source

GVA per hour worked (Current Price (smoothed))

2020

£33.30

£32.30 (2019)

 

£37.70

ONS

GVA per job filled (Current Price (smoothed))

2020

£48,172

£47,945 (2019)

 

£58,054

ONS

Gross median full-time annual earnings (workplace-based)

2021

£29,581

£28,609 (2020)

 

£31,480

ONS

Indicator 
Latest release date
Latest Value
Previous Value
Comparison against the previous value
England’s average
Source

Jobseekers Allowance and Universal Credit Claimant levels

October 2022

9,640 9,900  (September 2022)

 

N/A

ONS

Proportion of households fuel poor

2020

14.9%

14.05% (2019)

 

13.2%

BEIS

% of population at working age

2021

61%

60% (2020)

⬅➡

 

63%

ONS

Employment rate

2021

79.2%

77.4% (2020)

 

75.1%

ONS

Unemployment rate

2021

2.5%

2.3%

⬅➡

 

4.6%

ONS

Economically Inactive

2021

18.8%

20.8%

21.2%

ONS

Indicator
Latest release date
Latest Value
Previous Value
Comparison against the previous value
England’s average
Source

% of people have a NVQ 4+ qualification

2021

48.4%

40.6% (2020)

 

43.2%

ONS

% with no qualifications

 

2021

5.4%

4.8% (2020)

 

6.4%

ONS

Proportion of workers in higher skilled occupations

2021

53.5%

45.8%

51%

ONS

16-17 years olds not in education, employment or training

Average of Dec 2020, Jan 2021 & Feb 2020

1,430

1,130 (average of Dec 2019, Jan 2020 & Feb 2020)

 

DfE

Indicator 
Latest release date
Latest Value
Previous Value
Comparison against the previous value
England’s average
Source

% of homes rated EPC C or better

up to and including 31 March 2022

35%

34% (Sept 2021)

 

40%

Energy Performance of Buildings data: England and Wales

Average property prices

September 2022

£308,349

£304,606 (August 2022)

 

£314,268

UK House Price Index

Housing affordability ratio (Median)

2021

8.75

8.15 (2020)

 

9.05

ONS

CO2 Emissions estimates

2020

4,599

5,049.4 (2019)

 

BEIS

Indicator
Latest release date
Latest Value
Previous Value
Comparison against the previous value
England’s average
England’s average

Number of SMEs

2022

39,805

39,245 (2021)

 

 

ONS

Number of Large businesses

2021

130

130 (2021)

⬅➡

 

ONS

Count of birth of new enterprises

2021

3,525

3,070 (2020)

 

 

ONS

Payrolled employee counts from PAYE

September 2022) 364,870 363,911 (August 2022)

 

 

ONS

Job density

(the number of workplace jobs per resident aged 16-64)

2021

0.77

0.73 (2020)

0.75

ONS

Amount of Goods and Services Exported (Millions)

2020

£2,663

£2,859 (2019)

 

 

Subnational trade in goods

Subnational trade in services

The above provides a snapshot of York and North Yorkshire’s economy, covering key facts such as productivity and demographics. For more information on what this means, please see our specialist research below. To find out how we’re responding to the challenges and opportunities of our economy, head to our Strategy page

In York and North Yorkshire, we have targets to reach net-zero by 2034 and carbon negative by 2040. That may seem ambitious, but research has ensured we can take realistic action and support stakeholders to make changes that will enable this transition. This evidence has been integral to our Routemap to Carbon Negative.

We want to create opportunities so everyone in York and North Yorkshire can thrive. By analysing current skills supply and demand, and working with local communities and businesses to understand their needs, we will empower everyone to realise their full potential and contribute towards economic growth in our region.

York and North Yorkshire covers a variety of places, from the urban city of York to rural market towns, a breath-taking coastline and two National Parks. This is what often makes the sub-region an attractive location to live, work and learn. But, equally, it can cause constraints, particularly around poor connectivity and unaffordable housing. Our evidence and research is vital to understand where these challenges remain and how we can maximise our assets.

The past couple of years have been a turbulent period for businesses (from leaving the EU to a global pandemic), which has created uncertainty about the future. New challenges have also arisen as a result, including a smaller labour market and supply chain constraints. By combining data with intelligence from stakeholders, we can identify the best route to support our businesses and ensure their prosperity. 

Historical research can be found in our archive